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Five new additions to our list of environmental magazines and journals

In For Writers, Journals and Magazines, Writing Opportunities by John YunkerLeave a Comment

http://www.gullzine.com/ We now have a list of 46 journals and magazines dedicated to environmental essays, stories and poetry. Here are five of the newest additions: EcoHustler  http://www.ecohustler.co.uk Emergence Magazine   https://emergencemagazine.org Wild Hope   https://wildhope.org Gull  www.gullzine.com Epizootics   epizooticszine.wordpress.com Alterity   www.alteritystudies.org/alterity-journal   As always, if you have anything new to add to our list, let me know.  

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Ecovillages Around the World: 20 Regenerative Designs for Sustainable Communities edited by Frederica Miller

In Anthropocene, Book Reviews, Nonfiction by Heather TaftLeave a Comment

As a conservation biologist I see ecovillages as an example for all of us. We need to reduce our impact on the Earth, and these communities are doing that well. This book looked like it would provide good examples to show my students how they could reduce their impact as well.  However, I would have liked more detail to help others start their own community, or give people ideas for ways to reduce their individual impact on the Earth. Ecovillages Around the World: 20 Regenerative Designs for Sustainable Communities edited by Frederica Miller is the fifth book in a series. …

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Book Review: Penguins in the Desert by Eric Wagner

In Birds, Book Reviews, Conservation, Endangered Species, Nonfiction, Oceans by Midge RaymondLeave a Comment

As a former volunteer for Dee Boersma at the Punta Tombo Magellanic colony in Argentina, I was especially eager to read Eric Wagner’s Penguins in the Desert, in which he recounts the six months he and his wife, El, spent among the penguins in 2008. Two years earlier, my husband, John Yunker, and I spent a week at Punta Tombo, and we walked through many of the same places, counted many of the same penguins, got to know the colony’s beloved Turbo, and probably stayed in the same trailer Wagner and his wife shared two years later. Yet Wagner’s six …

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Eager: The fall and rise of the North American beaver

In Animal Behavior, Animal Rights, Book Reviews, Conservation, Nonfiction, Oceans, Pollution, Trees by John Yunker

Pity the keystone species. Those animals upon which the health of so many ecosystems depend — wolves and jaguars, sharks and sea otters, to name just a few. Due in large part to their outsized impact on our planet, they are often blamed for getting in our way. Wolves take our cows and sheep. Sea otters take our seafood. And jaguars and sharks take away our sense of comfort on land and in water. Beavers are also a keystone species and, not surprisingly, no friend to many city managers or land owners. They create chaos with our human-built rivers and drains. And, because …

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American Wolf: A True Story of Survival and Obsession in the West

In Animal Behavior, Book Reviews, Endangered Species, Nonfiction, Wolves by Jacki Skole

In 2006, a wolf was born in Yellowstone National Park. Named O-Six, she would grow into a fierce fighter, doting mother, and merciful leader. She’d be beloved by the park’s wolf watchers and a favorite of tourists who flocked to the park hoping to catch sight of her. Upon her death, she would be celebrated in the New York Times as “the most famous wolf in the world.” American Wolf: A True Story of Survival and Obsession in the West by award-winning journalist Nate Blakeslee is a riveting account of O-Six’s life and untimely death. It is also the story …

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Return of the Sea Otter: The story of a resilient species and its many human friends

In Animal Behavior, Book Reviews, Climate Change, Endangered Species, Nonfiction, Oceans by John Yunker

The sea otter should have been extinct by now. We, as in human civilization, did our very best to eliminate the species — not because we saw it as a pest but because its pelts were among the most desirable. And so hundreds of thousands of these sea mammals were killed because they happened to posses the densest fur coats of any animal on this planet. But the sea otter somehow managed to survive the slaughter. Handfuls of otters in Russia and the coasts of Alaska and California escaped, and, over time, their populations grew. Return of the Sea Otter: The …

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BirdNote: Chirp-sized bird stories from the popular radio show

In Animal Behavior, Birds, Book Reviews, Conservation, Endangered Species, Nonfiction by John Yunker

Here in Ashland, Oregon, I listen to our local radio station KSKQ. And for the past several years I’ve enjoyed the weekly, two-minute BirdNote programs. So I was excited to find that there is now a BirdNote book. What the book lacks in audio, it makes up for in very high print production values; it is beautifully designed, with full-color illustrations and a handy bookmark tassel. This will make an excellent gift for the would-be birder in your family. And even veteran birders will enjoy it. While I’d like to think I’ve learned a fair amount about birds over the years …

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Book Review: Junk Raft by Marcus Eriksen

In Birds, Book Reviews, Nonfiction, Oceans, Oil, Pollution by Midge Raymond

Junk Raft: An Ocean Voyage and a Rising Tide of Activism to Fight Plastic Pollution tells the terrifying and important story of plastics in our oceans, framed by Marcus Eriksen’s journey aboard Junk, the all-plastic raft he and his sailing partner took from California to Hawaii to raise awareness of the plight of our seas. Eriksen, who would later go on to co-found the organization 5 Gyres Institute with his wife, Anna, writes about the 2,600-mile journey over eighty-eight days and its challenges—among them, structural problems with the raft and bracing storms—interspersing the narrative with facts that all consumers should …

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Book Review: Back from the Brink by Nancy F. Castaldo

In Book Reviews, Children's Books, Conservation, Endangered Species, Nonfiction by Heather Taft

Back from the Brink, by Nancy F. Castaldo, is a collection of stories for older kids (10 – 12 years old) about animals that have come very close to extinction.  Due to efforts from conservation researchers and passionate individuals who want to see these species survive, their populations have increased again.  I recommend this book for students who are interested in conservation and learning about how researchers help save species that are on the verge of extinction.  It would make an excellent addition to a school library. The book starts with an introduction to the legislation that helps protect species, …

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The Overstory: An arboreal love story (and lament)

In Anthropocene, Book Reviews, Climate Change, Conservation, Endangered Species, Fiction, Trees by John Yunker

When we started EcoLit Books five years ago, this was the type of book I had in mind. A novel that places nature in its proper place in relation to people. That is, above us — in this case, both figuratively and literally. In The Overstory, Richard Powers has crafted an epic novel that stretches hundreds of years, culminating in a series of life-and-death environmental battles. But even more so, this is a novel about rediscovering the largest and oldest living creatures on our planet. So many of the characters are alien to the trees they share the planet with until …