Book Review: BITCH by Lucy Cooke

As a zoology student, Lucy Cooke was taught that the females of the species are exploited, weak, and passive. As a human animal, Cooke begged to differ. In Bitch: On the Female of the Species, she challenges this sexist mythology across species, from birds to primates to whales, showing that females can be just as sexually …

Read more

Book Review: FELLOWSHIP POINT by Alice Elliott Dark

Alice Elliott Dark’s beautiful, sprawling novel Fellowship Point is about land and stewardship, about nature and conservation, but more than that, it is a book of friendship across the decades and about the complexities of women’s lives, told in part by two extraordinary narrators who experienced nearly a century of life in the world. Agnes …

Read more

Book Review: THE HIGH HOUSE by Jessie Greengrass

While Jessie Greengrass’s remarkable novel The High House is set primarily in a grim future, this is not purely dystopian fiction—in fact, it feels far more contemporary, like a novel of our imminent reality. The High House doesn’t depict a world completely transformed by climate change as much as it reveals our world—a world slowly and inevitably ravaged as …

Read more

The 2021 Siskiyou Prize winner & finalists!

We are thrilled to announce the 2021 Siskiyou Prize winner and finalists!  It was another record year of submissions, and we couldn’t be more pleased to see so many writers tacking climate change, the oceans, animal issues, and so many other topics related to the planet we call home. It’s inspiring to see how powerful …

Read more

Book Review: Julian Sancton’s MADHOUSE AT THE END OF THE EARTH

Julian Sancton’s Madhouse at the End of the Earth tells the riveting, page-turning story of the Belgica’s multinational expedition to Antarctica, led by Belgian commandant Adrien de Gerlache. This may be not be among the best-known stories of Antarctic exploration, but it is certainly among the most harrowing, as well as the most haunting, with an abundance of …

Read more

Book Review: Ash Davidson’s DAMNATION SPRING

Living in Southern Oregon, not far north of where Ash Davidson’s Damnation Spring is set, I’ve grown used to passing trucks that are overloaded with timber, and mountainsides bare from clear-cuts. Knowing that this novel is about logging redwoods in the late 1970s, I wasn’t sure how biased I might be, as an reader who is decidedly …

Read more

2021 Siskiyou Prize submissions are open!

Submissions are now open for the Siskiyou Prize for New Environmental Literature. This year’s award, sponsored by Ashland Creek Press and the Sitka Center for Art and Ecology, will be judged by Deb Olin Unferth. The 2021 Siskiyou Prize is open to published books and unpublished book-length manuscripts in fiction and nonfiction, including novels, memoirs, and short …

Read more

Book Review: We Love You, Charlie Freeman by Kaitlyn Greenidge

Kaitlyn Greenidge’s stunning and unique novel, We Love You, Charlie Freeman, begins as the story of a family that moves into the The Toneybee Institute for Ape Research to teach an abandoned young chimpanzee sign language—yet while the novel is very much about language, its focus veers from chimpanzees and delves into the institute’s dark …

Read more

Item added to cart.
0 items - $0.00