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The Overstory: An arboreal love story (and lament)

In Anthropocene, Book Reviews, Climate Change, Conservation, Endangered Species, Fiction, Trees by John YunkerLeave a Comment

When we started EcoLit Books five years ago, this was the type of book I had in mind. A novel that places nature in its proper place in relation to people. That is, above us — in this case, both figuratively and literally. In The Overstory, Richard Powers has crafted an epic novel that stretches hundreds of years, culminating in a series of life-and-death environmental battles. But even more so, this is a novel about rediscovering the largest and oldest living creatures on our planet. So many of the characters are alien to the trees they share the planet with until …

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Upcoming writer and artist opportunities at PLAYA

In Education, Events, For Writers, Writing Opportunities by John Yunker

PLAYA, a creative residency program in Summer Lake, Oregon, is organizing two exciting artist+scientist opportunities for next year: Confluence of Creative Inquiry: Climate Change Communication Residency July 3-4, 2017 Art + Science and the Cultural Terrain July 17-August 11, 2017 For more information on how to participate, click here. And, of course, PLAYA is also accepting general artist residency applications for 2017. PS: PLAYA is a generous sponsor of the Siskiyou Prize for New Environmental Literature.

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Book Review — Collared: Politics and Personalities in Oregon’s Wolf Country

In Animal Rights, Book Reviews, Endangered Species, Nonfiction, Wolves by Beckie Elgin

Wolves–will they ever cease to create controversy and incite emotion? After all, they are just another four-legged, fur-covered predator–powerful, but certainly not the “beast of waste and desolation,” that Teddy Roosevelt called them. Hopefully, the time will come when our biases become obsolete and people accept Canis lupus as the survivors they are. But we are still light years away from this understanding. Which, in a sense is OK, because if wolves weren’t such a love ‘em or loath ‘em species, people would probably stop writing about them. And we wouldn’t have books like Aime Lyn Eaton’s Collared: Politics and …